GIFTS FOR GARDENERS

 

By Michelle Rauch
What’s a gardener to do in December?
Bleak, blustery days highlighted not with visions of sugar plums dancing in your head, but visions of a barren yard blanketed with snow. Alas, we green thumbs must make the most of our time insulated indoors. I begin with a little song that also captures a gift list to keep the gardener entertained through the long winter:
On the first day of Christmas my true love sent to me: A bird house to put in my tree;
On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me: Two paperwhite bulbs, and a bird house to put in my tree;
On the third day of Christmas my true love sent to me: Three gardening books, two paperwhite bulbs and a bird house to put in my tree;
On the fourth day of Christmas my true love sent to me: Four potted herbs, three gardening books, two paperwhite bulbs, and a bird house to put in my tree;
On the fifth day of Christmas my true love sent to me: Five bags of seed, four potted herbs, three gardening books, two paperwhite bulbs, and a bird house to put in my tree!
Ah, bha-humbug. That’s the best I can do. But do take note, those are great wish list items for the gardeners in your life. Paperwhite and amaryllis bulbs are a beautiful addition indoors during the winter. Potted herbs in a sunny window give hot soups and stews a punch of flavor this time of year.
December is a wonderful month for bird watchers. I caught the bug for bird watching two years ago this month. Since food is less plentiful in the winter, birds rely on feeders even more. You will be amazed at the variety of birds you will see this time of year if you place a feeder outside your window. This month the National Audubon Society is celebrating its 115th annual Christmas bird count. Volunteers are needed and it’s easy to participate. December 15th through January 5th is your chance to document the birds that pass through your neighborhood. The data that is collected is used for assessment of health and population of many species of birds as well as conservation efforts. It’s billed as the longest running wildlife census. The data is used to assess the health of bird populations and conservation needs.
If you are interested in participating, visit the National Audubon Website for more information, birds.audubon.org/christmas-bird-count.

 


Posted on 2014-12-03 by
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